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Archive for September 2013

The inconvenient truth of fertility decline

Written by our guest contributor, Irenee Daly, Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. This post originally appeared in BioNews.org, Issue 713 and has been excerpted with the author’s and journal’s permission. The July/ August edition of the US magazine, The Atlantic, featured the article ‘How long can you wait to have a […]

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Article in The Atlantic ignites debate on how long women really can wait to have children

An article recently published in The Atlantic by Jean Twenge has reignited debate about age-related fertility declines and just how long women can safely wait to have children. Twenge challenges the relevance and validity of the data upon which medical estimations have been based regarding age-related fertility declines for women in their 30s. She argues […]

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Beating the odds after being diagnosed with Premature Ovarian Failure

My name is Cole. I’m writing this today because I feel it is important to get my story out there to as many women as possible. To give inspiration to those wanting a family but are suffering from infertility and encourage them to not lose hope. I am 34 years old and had come off […]

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Antioxidants unlikely to boost female fertility

Antioxidants, which are found in many fruits and vegetables and are also available in supplements/pill form, are generally accepted to have positive benefits for overall health. Women seeking treatment for infertility often are encouraged to eat foods high in antioxidants or to take antioxidant supplements (e.g., vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin D, melatonin, Omega 3 […]

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