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Content Tagged: Female fertility

New test allows IVF treatment to be tailored to woman’s fertility cycle

Thousands of couples experiencing infertility may be able to become parents thanks to a new test that tailors in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment to a woman’s fertility cycle. There is a small two to four day window per cycle when an embryo can attach to a woman’s uterine wall. For the first time, researchers believe […]

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I’m 28 and just had my first child 8 months ago. I am still breastfeeding my daughter. We were trying for about a year before becoming pregnant. We want to have another child, but aren’t sure when we should start trying again, especially if it takes another year. Is it easier to get pregnant again once you’ve had a child already?

Written by our medical expert Dr. Beth Taylor, co-founder and co-director of Olive Fertility Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia.   Congratulations on the birth of your daughter! When women breastfeed their body produces a hormone called prolactin. This hormone can prevent ovulation and thereby keep your periods away. The more you breastfeed the higher your prolactin levels […]

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7 gadgets and apps to help track your fertility

Fox News recently profiled 7 new gadgets and smart phone apps that can help women get healthy and optimize and track their fertility. They include: Wink: Kindara’s Wink includes a wireless oral fertility thermometer to record basal body temperature. The thermometer syncs with a fertility app to help a woman track her menstrual cycle, cervical […]

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New study finds no special fertility risks for women with celiac disease

A recent study may provide welcome relief to women with celiac disease who are hoping to have children in the future. According to the study, women with celiac disease are no more likely to have fertility problems than women without the disorder. Celiac disease is caused by an adverse reaction to gluten, which can cause […]

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